Sundews

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“Show us something that contains something else”,  is this week’s photo challenge. In these shots, the insectivorous plants contain the ants and other hapless insects innocently going about their daily tasks.  Lured by scent and then ensnare by the sticky tentacles, digestive enzymes are released to dissolve and while the leaves curl dinner is neatly contained.

Though I’m sure you would admit that there is a stealthy beauty to these glistening ant traps.  They remind me of sea anemones, and their glistening ‘dew-drops’ make wonderful macro photos.

To find further examples of this week’s challenge by click here.

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12 thoughts on “Sundews

    1. Yes, they are attractive…. Have been stopping by this particular colony for about a year, following their progress through the seasons. It’s all very slow motion – i’m not sure whether the ‘dewy’ substance acts as a glue, but tentacles react and pins the prey down.

  1. Liz-
    Your post is fantastic. You set me to wondering if there are carnivorous plants in Oregon. And, YES! There are, and we have a State Park dedicated to its preservation. The park is about 3 hours from my house. Guess where I’m planning a trip to go see?
    Darlingtonia State Natural Site is the only Oregon state park property dedicated to the protection of a single plant species. Concurrently, the plants it protects are the only carnivorous flora in the system.

    This 18-acre botanical park provides parking and a boardwalk trail out into a fen that is home to Darlingtonia californica. Also called a cobra lily, the rare, strangely-shaped plant is the only member of the pitcher plant family (Sarraceniaceae) in Oregon.

    Thanks for the inspiration!
    Jane

    1. Yes, the colour variation is fascinating and i’m absorbed by trying to capture what’s on the daily menu. It’s been really wet these past few months, not an ant in sight, but plenty of little flies, midges. A very tantalising macro subject 🙂

  2. Lovely macros of life and death in a bog. I’m partial to your first image – the shallow DOF and clean, sunlit background provide a refreshing perspective that I haven’t seen before. Will keep that in mind the next time I’m sloshing around in the small bog near home. I don’t see much on this subject of bog life and am glad you tackled it. Nice work Liz.

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