The otters came calling

Night noises can sometimes be quite unsettling.  A high-pitched wailing sounded eerie and threatening:  the Cape clawless otters had arrived in dynamic form.   Their squealing sounded full of quest.  We’re guessing that they are the young adults from the family group which range this section of the coast.  What a rumpus as they called through the night, but it bodes well to know that they are back as the vegetation sheltering their holt was partially destroyed in the recent fire.

The otter holt

We had a lucky to sighting in the morning as they made they way back to the water.

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More otter accounts can be found here.

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35 thoughts on “The otters came calling

  1. Your otter photos and stories are among my favorites from the urban edge ecosystem. I’ve been in or near otter habitat for decades and have yet to see more than the sign of their presence. Like Earth Under My Feet, I’m a bit green with envy! In this post, the backdrop of huge, weathered boulders is definitely “value added”. Love the last image!

    1. Yes we’re lucky here – a fresh water well draws them to this area. They use it to wash down prey such as shark after its been caught. They strip the skin and wash off the ammonia before eating the flesh. Clever creatures! Hope you’ll be rewarded one day with a sighting in your neck of the woods.

  2. I spotted a group on the water’s edge a couple of months ago while taking a stroll below the Southern end of of the golf course in the early morning. They were suspicious of my presence but not really frightened. I was careful to keep a reasonable distance and not to make sudden or threatening gestures. Eventually I moved on since they appeared to be getting agitated – and even possibly hostile. The only time I’ve seen them.

    1. We’re lucky at this end of the peninsula :). They’re shy, but occasionally i hear marvellous accounts of ‘meetings’. One neighbour was walking his golden retriever pup at Fisherman’s when a young otter came out of the water and the two romped across the beach playing together.

    1. Yes, here the 80-400mm is an asset as the otters are easily spooked and having a telephoto lens is the answer. On some occasions I’ve managed to ‘leopard’ crawl stealthily to within a closer range, but they are very wary of humans.

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