Cape Grey Mongoose

Cape grey mongoose

Happily I recently spotted one of the young mongooses crossing the garden patio.  It’s old enough to be independent now and to forage on it’s own. The family has been skittish, laying low as a caracal (lynx) has moved into the area.   Put a predator in the mix and there’s a palpable sense of alertness.  The dassie (rock Hyrax) colony which live below along the rocky shore are hyper-vigilant, doubling sentry duty.  Their urgent alarm calls ring through the air and send everthing diving for cover of safety.   A caracal’s range may extend to a large area, but with the recent fires, there is scant vegetation cover and perhaps meager pickings for a lean hungry predator.  Meanwhile gardening chores are undertaken with a degree of caution.

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30 thoughts on “Cape Grey Mongoose

    1. Interesting and much to obverse re food chain activity! The rock hyrax attract attention/ but pretty wiley wirh their duty sentries on watch. The mongoose isn’t a threat to humans, but i would respect the space of the caracal ((lynx). Not that they would attack humans, but i would not want to surprise, threaten or corner one. They’re a beefy little cat, the females weigh 8 -12 kilograms and the makes are heavier 15 – 18 kgs. They prey on small mammals like the mongoose and rock hyrax – can also bring down the smaller buck species. It’s an interesting neighbourhood tor sure.

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