Delta

Here it is: a single photo showing the passage of time, transitions and change.  This bleak scene signifies change – climate change.  A dry riverbed with almost no water may well be a typical scene in the future.  Described as a water scarce country, South Africa’s average annual rainfall is a mere 464mm. While parts of the country suffer drought conditions, the Western Cape is in dire straits.   This is “The new normal”, we are told.

This week Erica poses the WP  challenge:  Delta. Share a picture that sybolizes transitions, change and the passing of time.

The storm brings a feast for Cape baboons

Two days have passed since the storm and the sandy beach where I photographed the galloping zebra has altered in the aftermath. Today it is strewn with huge piles of kelp,  dislodged by the powerful waves and borne in on the spring high tide.

The kelp brought with it a bonanza for the baboons, a feast of  mussels still attached to the fronds.  The baboons living along the coast supplement their diet with this highly nutritious resource which is rich in omega oils.  They tucked in with gusto, and I noticed that some of the older females had packed their cheek pouches until they bulged into hanging pouches.  There was a lot of ‘chatter’ as they sucked and chewed and a delightful sound of ‘hiccups’ as one greedy adult male gulped down the morsels far too quickly.

The Road Taken: Ecosystem Engineers

Travelling through Sweden last summer, a back road through a forest took us through an unexpected landscape.  It looked as though a storm had cast it’s devastation striking down trees which lay hapzardly across a water course.  On closer inspection it turned out to be a piece of skillful engineering accomplished by a rather innocuous looking creature.  It was my first encounter with the extraordinary feats of a beaver family’s industrious accomplishments.

Their ability to physically alter habitats by cutting down trees, building dams, digging canals and building lodges has resulted in their recognition as ecosystem engineers.  The resulting change to the environment is far reaching, benefitting and altering the distribution and abundance of many organisms.

WPC: “The Road Taken”.

Flotsam Art

Ocean pollution is a huge concern worldwide, but head way up to 71*N in the extreme northern hemisphere to the remote village of Honningsvåg, on the island of Magerøya in the North Cape of Norway and meet Erica Haugli through her blog – Experience North Cape and Once Upon a Dream and be aware of  how bad the problem is there. Her campaign “One Step at a Time” to clean up the environment along the coastal stretches in this far flung spot on the map can be read here.
Her idea was to create colourful art collages out the odd shoes, boots and plastic to raise awareness to the mass of flotsam and rubbish deposited by the ocean currents on the once pristine shores.  What an eye-opener to learn that there is so much waste in the ocean so far north.  She achieved her aim and by 2014 her gallery was opened to the public.

Shoe art by Erica Haugli_01

Midnight sun_Erica Haugli

I was fortunate to travel with my husband to these remote parts on a journey aboard ship to see the northern lights and other magnificent wonders.  The day we stopped in Honningsvåg the wind was so ferocious that the trip to the North Cape was cancelled.  Happily we did get to ‘walk’ the village without being blown back out to sea.   Although I never got to meet Erica, as at the time she was down with a bad dose of flu, I was in awe of the hardy inhabitants who live at the edge of this inhospitable but hauntingly beautiful landscape.  Her artwork reflects these local scenes and topics, perhaps you’d like to check her online galleries.

HonningsvagVillage of Honningsvag

Inspired by the Weekly Photo Challenge: Repurpose