The Octopus’s Garden

 

Krista poses the question this week: “If given the choice, what would you rather be doing, right now?”   Imagine a place – a “Stop-the-world-I-want-to-get-off” kind of a place where you can escape the hurley-burley and be amazed and awed by a completely different world.  False Bay here in the southern peninsula of Cape Town is a wondrous place, where the influence of two ocean currents – the warm Agulhas and the cold Benguela mingle and create a flourishing ecosystem.

It’s been a while since i dipped below the waters, but recently my interest is inspired through the marvellous Blue Planet II series where the episode the ” Green Seas” features the extraordinary creatures living in the kelp forest including the cunning behaviour of a smart octopus.

WPC: Rather

 

The Scend of the Sea

At times the elements conspire in perfect harmony to produce exquisite serenity.  The harsh wind retreats and the sea wallows quietly:

In the scene below Venus Pool lies unruffled in a silken sheen.

Conditions can change quickly though and the Atlantic Ocean can push up in rambunctious form with that devillish “Cape Doctor”, the southeasterly wind and the full moon spring tides.  Sometimes it also drives low cloud scudding across the Peninsula in a ‘black’ mood and cloaks the mountains in a foggy blanket of moisture.    On one such morning, we stand and watch in awe as waves come belting out of the ocean in a heart thumping rhythm smashing into the rocky ledges.  It’s as if Mother Nature lifts up her skirts to dance a fandango.  Two swimmers enter the pool and in a daring dash of defiance in the face of such raw power, they sprint across and back to safety.  Whatever it is, this sense of ebullience, we leave feeling high on elation.

WPC:  Variations on a theme – tying into the moods of the sea.

 

Southern Right whales: nomads of the southern seas

They’re back!  The gentle giants – the Southern Right (Eubalaena australis) whales ply the seas from the Antarctic visiting the Cape shores between June and November.  Despite their size they have gymnastic tendencies.  Through leaping, tail lobbing and spy hopping they create fantastic shows with tremendous splash down .  They’re easily recognised by their callosities (sometimes mistaken for barnacles) that cover their heads and blowholes.  These patterns are like unique fingerprints particular to each individual.

They’re welcomed with joyful spirit by the many spectators who enjoy their exuberant antics.

WPC: Transient